Sunday 4 May – Screen Shadows present A Sixth Part of The World

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A Sixth Part of the World (1926) 

Book tickets – Sunday 4 May – 2pm – £3

Even as the size and pace of the modern city challenged a definition of ‘community’ based on a sharing of space, filmmakers from across the political spectrum attempted ever more ambitious reconfigurations of community across state, nation and empire.

Week Two – Nation, Empire and The United-Ness of the United States

Sunday 4th May – 2pm – Free

A Sixth Part of the World (1926) 73 mins. dir. Vertov – With Intro from Alex Graham

Beer at Its Best (1955) 15 mins. dir. Star Lager

Mars Attacks! (1996) (extract) . dir. Tim Burton

Native Land (1942) (extract) . dir. Paul Strand 

With A Sixth Part of the World, Vertov attempts to create a kino-bond between workers across the Soviet Union, a vast multi-ethnic empire stretching from the Baltic to the Pacific ocean and spanning eleven time zones. While Vertov uses labour to form a sense of community between peasant, miner and factory worker, Beer at its Best, a short documentary by a Nigerian brewery from the colonial film archive, uses the creation of one commodity to create a shared sense of belonging between the UK and its empire.

 The films will be followed by a short presentation looking at community across the United States of America, drawing on films from Paul Strand’s Native Land (1942) and Tim Burton’s Mars Attacks! (1996).

Alex Graham is a PhD candidate at UCL-SSEES, working on readings of aesthetic experimentation and the politics of film production at the Lenfilm studio between 1968 and 1991. His MA dissertation project on history, memory and readability in the completed films of Aleksei German Sr. was published as an extended article in the journal ‘Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema’ 6 : 2, 2012, 177-216. His other main research interests include the films of Kira Muratova, early cinema, the Modernist avant-gardes and phenomenology in film theory. He is interested in the history of collection-based film curatorship and the politics of archival film preservation.

Event supported by Film Hub London, managed by Film London and a proud partner of the BFI Film Audience Network, funded by the National Lottery. www.filmlondon.org.uk/filmhub

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